Department of English, College of LAS, University of Illinois


Footnotes: The English Department Newsletter

Volume 57 | February 4, 2013| Number 17

FROM THE GRADUATE STUDIES OFFICE

Congratulations!
Heather Vorhies successfully defended her dissertation “A Physiological Definition of Style: Science, Religion, and Women's Writings in the Early American Republic.” (Mortensen, Ch.; Underwood, Markley, O'Gorman) on 1/22/13.

Upcoming Events
Michael Behrens final defense is scheduled for Wednesday, February 6th from 11:30-1:30
Amanda Zink final defense is scheduled for Monday, February 25th from 2-4

Spring 2013 – Dates to Remember 
February 22: Last day to elect credit-no-credit option for a first half-session course or to change
from credit-no-credit option to a regular grade
February 22: Last day to drop a first half-session course
March 8: Last day for student to drop a semester course on Web Self-Service
March 11: Second half-session courses begin
March 16-24: Spring Break
March 25: Instruction resumes
April 1:  Registration for summer and fall begins.  Start times vary.  See your time ticket for
your exact enrollment time at UI Integrate Self Service (https://apps.uillinois.edu/selfservice/)
April 5: Last day to add a second half-session course
April 5:  Last day to take final exam for May doctoral degree
April 12: Deadline for Graduate Student Academic Services office to receive the final exam
Certificate of Result
April 12: Last day to withdraw from the current term without a grade of W
April 12: Last day to elect credit-no-credit option for a semester course or to change from
credit-no-credit option to a regular grade
April 12: Last day for student to drop a semester course without a grade of W (without
approval)
April 12:  Last day to add name to May degree list.  Must use Web Self-Service
April 19:  Last day to complete deposit of May doctoral dissertations
April 26:  Last day to elect credit-no-credit option for a second half-session course or to change
from credit-no-credit option to a regular grade
April 26:  Last day to drop a second half-session course
April 26:  Last day to complete deposit of May master’s theses
May 1: Instruction ends
May 2: Reading Day
May 2: Last day to add or drop a second half-session course with approval (a W is recorded)
May 2: Last day to add or drop a semester course with approval (a W is recorded)
May 2:  Last day to change a grade of DFR (in a non-thesis course) or I, awarded last fall to
prevent F by rule
May 3 -10: Final examination period       
May 12:  May degree conferral (Commencement)
May 17:  Last date for receipt of completed petitions in the Graduate College for graduating
students

 

GRADUATE STUDENT WORKSHOPS

Becoming a Pro: Workshops on Academic Professionalization
I wanted to invite you to join in a series of workshops this semester about getting acquainted with various aspects of the academic profession, from conferences and publishing to winning fellowships and preparing for the job market. The sessions are being organized by myself and the Placement Director, Justine Murison, to help students figure out what they’re supposed to be doing along the road from student to professor.

These workshops are meant to be very informal and offer a venue for you to get information, ask questions, and share thoughts, tips, and concerns. We’ll cover topics such as organizing your research agenda, writing conference abstracts, getting to know people in your field, submitting work for publication, applying for fellowships, and preparing for the job market. Come to one or come to all, and if you miss one this year, don’t worry; we hope to offer a similar series next year, too.

Please mark your calendars for the following dates:

February 7, 4-5 PM: Professional development: The Big Picture (104 EB)
February 21, 4-5 PM: Attending Conferences and Building Your Profile (104 EB)
April 4, 4-5 PM: The Grad Student's Guide to Publishing (104 EB)
April 10 3-5 PM: Free Money! Applying for External Fellowships (160 EB)
May 2, 3:30-5:30 PM: Planning for the 2013-2014 Job Market (115 EB)

Hope to see you there,
Renee R. Trilling


RESEARH FORUM

Center for Writing Studies - Graduate Student Research Forum
February 7, 2013
4:00-5:30 p.m.
126 GSLIS

Sonia Kline, Curriculum & Instruction
“I Can’t Write Nothing Down If I Don’t Know How To”: Mapping Texts and Contexts in Middle School Online Writing

While the importance of context is widely recognized in studies of scholastic writing, the connections among students’ textual products and aspects of context are seldom mapped out. Drawn from my dissertation research on middle school students composing in Scholar, an online writing environment that supports peer response, this talk details the case of Tanisha, an eighth grade African-American female, situated in a school that serves a predominately low-income population. Her case is of particular interest because she moved between two very different language arts classes taught by the same teacher—one with a mandated curriculum, the other without a formal curriculum. By examining her texts captured within the online environment, and texts and talk generated within and beyond the classroom, my work traces and makes visible connections among her texts, the texts of others, and broader socio-cultural-historic contexts.

Rebecca Woodard, Curriculum & Instruction
“Creative Writing, Blogging, and Teaching Writing: A Sociocultural Account of Trajectories of Teacher Practice”

Although the idea that “writing teachers must write” is pervasive, little is known about how teachers’ participation in out-of-school literacy practices shapes their instruction. To date, most research on teacher practice has been limited to either classrooms or professional development sites. This talk broadens the study of teacher practice by moving beyond classroom walls with Lisa, a middle school Language Arts teacher, and Aaron, a high school English teacher. As I follow both teachers out from their classrooms—Lisa into her creative writing group, and Aaron across his participation in a local National Writing Project Summer Institute and various online writing spaces—I identify ways teachers’ literacy practices both inform and disrupt their identities, discourses, and teaching practices. This research reconceptualizes what it means to be a writing teacher and how to understand and research teacher development from a sociocultural practice perspective.

For more information contact Teresa Bertram at 333-3251 (tbertram@illinois.edu)

 

WRITING CONTESTS

Spring 2013 - Junior Quinn Awards
Deadline: Noon, Friday, February 22, 2013

The Junior Quinn Awards recognize achievement and potential in Creative Writing by Junior Creative Writing Majors. 

Submit a sample of your work (creative nonfiction, 1-2 pieces, no more than 15 pages; fiction, 1-2 stories or an excerpt, no more than 15 pages; OR poetry, 3-5 poems, no more than 7 pages) and a statement of purpose (no more than 200 words explaining where you want to go, why you want to go there, and how the experience will impact your writing) in one electronic file (doc, rtf, or docx) by the February deadline.  

All submissions must be sent to sdavenpo@illinois.edu.  Depending on your entry (nonfiction, poetry, or fiction), the subject line of your email must read as follows: JRQUINNNONFICTION or JRQUINNPOETRY or JRQUINNFICTION.  If you enter in more than one category, you will need to send separate emails.    Your name, net id, and UIN number must appear in the body of the email.  Your nonfiction or poetry or fiction submission is to be contained in one attachment (doc, docx, or rtf only), the name of which should be as follows: contest category followed by your last name, such as NONFICTIONJONES or POETRYJONES or FICTIONJONES.  Your name should not appear in the attachment itself.

If you have questions, contact Steve Davenport, Associate Director of Creative Writing, at sdavenpo@illinois.edu.

Recipient of a Traveling Quinn will receive a scholarship to one of several predetermined writing workshops the following summer or, if approved by the Associate Director, to a workshop students have researched and chosen for themselves.  (Here’s a good place to start your research: http://www.newpages.com/writing-conferences/.)  This scholarship, worth up to $2,000, will be applied toward tuition of the workshop, travel, room and board.

 

2013 – UNDERGRADUATE CREATIVE WRITING AWARDS
Deadline: Noon, Friday, March
1, 2013

The English Department sponsors and administers two annual undergraduate literary competitions in Short Fiction and Poetry.  Depending on available funding, there will be 3-4 prizes in Fiction and 2-3 in Poetry this year.  Past prizes have ranged from $100 to $1000.  As soon as we have specific funding numbers available, we will announce them at our website:

http://creativewriting.english.illinois.edu/undergraduate/awards/

Contest rules are as follows:

Short Fiction:  no contestant may submit more than one story (7500 words, maximum length)

Poetry:  no contestant may submit more than 200 lines, as a single poem or a group of poems

Only University of Illinois undergraduate students are eligible to compete.  To be considered for a prize, submissions must adhere to the following rules.  All submissions must be sent to the following email address: sdavenpo@illinois.edu.  Depending on your entry (poetry or fiction), the subject line must read as follows: UNDERGRAD POETRY or UNDERGRAD FICTION (not both).  If you enter in both categories (poetry and fiction), you will need to send separate emails.  Your name, address, phone number, e-mail address, net id, status (undergrad), and UIN number must appear in the body of the email.  Your fiction OR poetry entry is to be contained in one attachment (doc, docx, or rtf only), the name of which should be as follows: contest category followed by your last name, such as FICTIONJONES or POETRYJONES.  Your name should not appear in the attachment itself.

Steve Davenport
Associate Director of Creative Writing

 

2013 – GRADUATE CREATIVE WRITING AWARDS
Deadline: Noon, Friday, March 1, 2013

The English Department sponsors and administers two annual graduate creative writing competitions.

Short Fiction:  Josephine M. Bresee Memorial Award, $500; Robert J. and Katharin Carr Graduate Fiction Prize, $300.

Poetry:  Carol Kyle Memorial Award, $400; Robert J. and Katharin Carr Poetry Prize, $300

Contest rules are as follows:

Short Fiction:  no contestant may submit more than one story (7500 words, maximum length)

Poetry:  no contestant may submit more than 200 lines, as a single poem or a group of poems

Only University of Illinois graduate students are eligible to compete.  To be considered for a prize, submissions must adhere to the following rules.  All submissions must be sent to the following email address: sdavenpo@illinois.edu.  Depending on your entry (poetry or fiction), the subject line must read as follows: GRAD POETRY or GRAD FICTION (not both).  If you enter in both categories (poetry and fiction), you will need to send separate emails.  Your name, address, phone number, e-mail address, net id, status (undergrad), and UIN number must appear in the body of the email.  Your fiction OR poetry entry is to be contained in one attachment (doc, docx, or rtf only), the name of which should be as follows: contest category followed by your last name, such as FICTIONJONES or POETRYJONES.  Your name should not appear in the attachment itself.

Steve Davenport
Associate Director of Creative Writing