Department of English, College of LAS, University of Illinois


Footnotes: The English Department Newsletter

Volume 57 | February 25, 2013| Number 20

FROM THE GRADUATE STUDIES OFFICE

Spring 2013 – Dates to Remember 
March 8: Last day for student to drop a semester course on Web Self-Service
March 11: Second half-session courses begin
March 16-24: Spring Break
March 25: Instruction resumes
April 1:  Registration for summer and fall begins.  Start times vary.  See your time ticket for
your exact enrollment time at UI Integrate Self Service (https://apps.uillinois.edu/selfservice/)
April 5: Last day to add a second half-session course
April 5:  Last day to take final exam for May doctoral degree
April 12: Deadline for Graduate Student Academic Services office to receive the final exam
Certificate of Result
April 12: Last day to withdraw from the current term without a grade of W
April 12: Last day to elect credit-no-credit option for a semester course or to change from
credit-no-credit option to a regular grade
April 12: Last day for student to drop a semester course without a grade of W (without
approval)
April 12:  Last day to add name to May degree list.  Must use Web Self-Service
April 19:  Last day to complete deposit of May doctoral dissertations
April 26:  Last day to elect credit-no-credit option for a second half-session course or to change
from credit-no-credit option to a regular grade
April 26:  Last day to drop a second half-session course
April 26:  Last day to complete deposit of May master’s theses
May 1: Instruction ends
May 2: Reading Day
May 2: Last day to add or drop a second half-session course with approval (a W is recorded)
May 2: Last day to add or drop a semester course with approval (a W is recorded)
May 2:  Last day to change a grade of DFR (in a non-thesis course) or I, awarded last fall to
prevent F by rule
May 3 -10: Final examination period       
May 12:  May degree conferral (Commencement)
May 17:  Last date for receipt of completed petitions in the Graduate College for graduating
students

 

Summer 2013 – Dates to Remember
5pm May 10:   Deadline to cancel summer 1 (4 week) and SF (summer full term) registration if not registered for any other summer course
May 13:   Instruction begins
May 17:   Last day for student to add a S1 course
May 17:   Deadline to submit forms to elect to audit a course for S1
May 27:   Memorial Day, All campus holiday
May 31:   Last day to elect credit/no-credit option for a S1 course or to change from credit/no-credit
option to a regular grade
May 31:   Last day to drop a S1 course without a grade of W
May 31:   Last day to withdraw from S1
5pm June 7:   Deadline to cancel SS1 Independent Study and summer 2 registration if you are not
enrolled for any other summer course
June 7:   Classes end
June 8:   Final examination period
June 10:   Eight week courses and SS1 Independent Study courses begin
June 21:   Last day to add a first half-session course (S2a)
June 21:   Last day to add an 8 week (S2) course
June 21:   Deadline to submit forms to elect to audit a course for S2
June 28:   Last day to elect credit/no-credit option for a first-half session course (S2a) or to change
from credit/no-credit option to a regular grade
June 28:   Last day to drop a first-half session (S2a) course
June 28:   Last day to take final exam for Aug doctoral degree
July 4:    All campus holiday
July 5:    Last day to add name to Aug degree list.  Must use Web Self-Service
July 5:    Deadline for Office of the Registrar to receive the final exam Certificate of Result
July 8:    Second-half courses begin
July 12:    Last day to complete deposit of Aug doctoral dissertations
July 19:    Last day to complete deposit of Aug Master's theses
July 19:    Last day to withdraw from S2 without a grade of W
July 19:    Last day for student to drop a S2 or SS1 Independent Study course
July 19:    Last day to elect credit/no-credit option for a S2 or SS1 Indep. Study course or to change
from credit/no-credit option to a regular grade
July 19:    Last day to add a second half-session (S2b) course
July 26:    Last day to drop a second half-session (S2b) course
July 26:    Last day to elect credit/no-credit option for a second half-session (S2b) course or to change
from credit/no-credit option to a regular grade
August 1:   Instruction ends - (noon)
August 1:   Reading Day - (1pm)
Aug 2-3:    Final examination period
August 5:   August degree conferral (no commencement)
August 9:   Last date for receipt of completed petitions in the Graduate College for graduating students

 

READINGS AND DISCUSSION

MEMORY/MEMOIR: Readings and Discussion by LeAnne Howe (English/American Indian Studies) and Audrey Petty (English), with Robert Ramirez (Theatre)

Date:February 27, 2013
Time:7:30 p.m.
Location:IPRH, Humanities Lecture Hall

About the event:
This event features members of the U of I Creative Writing faculty reading from their soon-to-be-published works. Professor LeAnne Howe will be reading from “An American Indian in Japan,” a creative non-fiction story about her travels throughout Japan during the 1993 International Year of Indigenous People. The story is forthcoming in Choctalking on Other Realities, New and Selected Stories, Aunt Lute Books, 2013. Professor Audrey Petty will be reading from High Rise Stories, forthcoming in McSweeney’s Voice of Witness book series (summer 2013), for which sheinterviewed former residents of the Chicago housing projects Cabrini-Green and Robert Taylor Homes, among others, for their firsthand accounts of Chicago public housing. Each author will read a selection, chosen for its particular significance to the author and her primary creative intention(s). After the authors have finished reading, Robert Ramirez will lead a discussion of the role of memory and memoir in the humanities more broadly, and we will open the floor for discussion with the audience.

About the speakers:
LeAnne Howe writes fiction, poetry, screenplays, scholarship, and plays that deal with Native experiences. An enrolled citizen of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma, her first novel Shell Shaker, Aunt Lute Books, 2001 received an American Book Award in 2002 from the Before Columbus Foundation. The French translation Equinoxes Rouge was the 2004 finalist for Prix Medici Estranger, one of France's top literary awards. Evidence of Red, Salt Publishing, UK, 2005 won the Oklahoma Book Award for poetry in 2006. Howe’s second novel, Miko Kings: An Indian Baseball Story, Aunt Lute Books, 2007 was chosen by Hampton University in Virginia as their 2009-2010 Read-in Selection.

Her recent awards include: the 2012 USA Artists Ford Fellowship, a $50,000 grant from United States Artists, a not for profit organization. Howe joins a class of 2012 awardees that includes Annie Proulx, Coco Fusco, Guillermo Gomez-Peña, David Henry Hwang, Edgar Heap of Birds, Adrienne Kennedy, and many others.  http://www.usafellows.org/fellow/leanne_howe

In 2012 she was also the winner of the 2012 Lifetime Achievement Award from the Native Writers Circle of the Americas http://www.wordcraftcircle.org/featured. In 2011 she was awarded the 2011 Tulsa Library Trust’s “American Indian Author Award” at Central Library in Tulsa, OK. http://www.tulsaworld.com/scene/article.aspx?subjectid=67&articleid=20101003_67_G4_CUTLIN997618.

Howe was a 2010-2011 J. William Fulbright Scholar at the University of Jordan, Amman. Her new novel-in-progress, Memoir of a Choctaw in the Arab Revolts 1917 & 2011 is set in Bilaad ash Sham, and Allen, Oklahoma.

LeAnne Howe’s forthcoming books are Seeing Red, Pixeled Skins: American Indians and Film, MSUP Press, March 2013, co-authored with Harvey Markowitz and Denise Cummings; and she will be reading from “An American Indian in Japan,” a creative non-fiction story about her travels throughout Japan during the 1993 International Year of Indigenous People. The story is forthcoming in Choctalking on Other Realities,New and Selected Stories, Aunt Lute Books, 2013.

Audrey Petty is a native Chicagoan. Her stories have appeared in such publications as StoryQuarterly, Callaloo, The Louisville Review,The Massachusetts Review, Painted Bride Quarterly, NimrodandAfrican American Review. They have also been anthologized in Gumbo: A Celebration of African American Writing and Black Writing from Chicago. Her essays have been featured inThe Oxford American, Saveur, ColorLines, The Southern Review, Gravy, Callaloo, Cornbread Nation 4 and Best Food Writing 2006anthology. Her poems have been published in Crab Orchard Review and Cimarron Review. She is the editor of High-Rise Stories, an oral history of Chicago public housing communities, due from Voice of Witness Press in the summer of 2013.

Audrey has been awarded a residency at the Hedgebrook Colony, the Richard Soref Scholarship from the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, and the Tennessee Williams Fellowship from the Sewanee Writers’ Conference. Her fiction has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize, and she’s received fellowships and grants from the Ford Foundation, the Mellon Foundation, the Illinois Arts Council and the Hewlett Foundation. She is an Associate Professor of English at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Robert Ramirez serves on the faculty of the Theatre Department where he teaches voice, speech, dialects and text work Robert Ramirez. He has performed with the New York, Utah, Illinois, Alabama, Baltimore and Wisconsin Shakespeare Festivals as well as numerous theaters in the New York City Area. He has also been seen on the Krannert Center Stages in Hamlet, Three Sisters and most recently, Our Town. He has been an award-winning Voice Artist and narrator of audio books for the past seventeen years and is a long-time member of the Recorded Books Repertory Company. Robert received his M.F.A. from the PTTP at the University of Delaware and prior to his move to Champaign-Urbana, served on the voice and speech faculties at Marymount Manhattan College and the American Musical and Dramatic Academy in New York City. Last year he was Voice and Text Coach for American Players Theatre in Spring Green, Wisconsin and he looks forward to returning there this summer.

 

COLLOQUIUM

Center for Writing Studies’ Colloquium Series
Mary Juzwik
Associate Professor of Language & Literacy
Michigan State University

February 28, 2013
4:00-5:30 p.m.
1000 Lincoln Hall

“Biblicism as Complex Literate Performance: Examining How the Bible Works in Secondary Students’ Essay Writing”

In recent years, scholars in composition and rhetoric, anthropology, and related fields have grown interested in the rhetorical and literacy practices of evangelical and fundamentalist Christians. A few scholars have studied the literate and interpretive practices surrounding the Bible for such persons. For example anthropologist Vincent Crapanzano influentially argues that, in contrast with more open modes of interpretation, fundamentalists engage in literalist Biblical reading that abhors figurative language, insists on one-to-one relationships between words and world and “admits no deviance from single, unambiguous meaning.” In this talk, I challenge that literalist account of fundamentalist (and, more broadly, evangelical) Christian Biblicism by contrasting ways that two 12th grade evangelical students in a Midwestern high school English classroom invoke the Bible in writing short “This I believe” essays in a senior English class. Through analysis of textual, interview, and classroom discourse data, I suggest how the students’ Biblical interpretive strategies function as complex social practices allowing them to simultaneously and artfully perform identities as academic writers and evangelical Christians in a public school. I situate this performative literate practice within the teacher’s religious identity and pedagogy. Finally, I suggest that the literalist story of how Biblicism works inaccurately reduces and demeans the richly diverse Biblical literacy practices and identity performances of both students and teachers.

For more information, contact Teresa Bertram at 333-3251 (tbertram@illinois.edu)