Department of English, College of LAS, University of Illinois


Footnotes: The English Department Newsletter

Volume 57 | April 29, 2013| Number 28

FROM THE GRADUATE STUDIES OFFICE

Spring 2013 – Dates to Remember 
May 1: Instruction ends
May 2: Reading Day
May 2: Last day to add or drop a second half-session course with approval (a W is recorded)
May 2: Last day to add or drop a semester course with approval (a W is recorded)
May 2:  Last day to change a grade of DFR (in a non-thesis course) or I, awarded last fall to
prevent F by rule
May 3 -10: Final examination period       
May 12:  May degree conferral (Commencement)
May 17:  Last date for receipt of completed petitions in the Graduate College for graduating
students

Summer 2013 – Dates to Remember
5pm May 10:   Deadline to cancel summer 1 (4 week) and SF (summer full term) registration if not registered for any other summer course
May 13:   Instruction begins
May 17:   Last day for student to add a S1 course
May 17:   Deadline to submit forms to elect to audit a course for S1
May 27:   Memorial Day, All campus holiday
May 31:   Last day to elect credit/no-credit option for a S1 course or to change from credit/no-credit
option to a regular grade
May 31:   Last day to drop a S1 course without a grade of W
May 31:   Last day to withdraw from S1
5pm June 7:   Deadline to cancel SS1 Independent Study and summer 2 registration if you are not
enrolled for any other summer course
June 7:   Classes end
June 8:   Final examination period
June 10:   Eight week courses and SS1 Independent Study courses begin
June 21:   Last day to add a first half-session course (S2a)
June 21:   Last day to add an 8 week (S2) course
June 21:   Deadline to submit forms to elect to audit a course for S2
June 28:   Last day to elect credit/no-credit option for a first-half session course (S2a) or to change
from credit/no-credit option to a regular grade
June 28:   Last day to drop a first-half session (S2a) course
June 28:   Last day to take final exam for Aug doctoral degree
July 4:    All campus holiday
July 5:    Last day to add name to Aug degree list.  Must use Web Self-Service
July 5:    Deadline for Office of the Registrar to receive the final exam Certificate of Result
July 8:    Second-half courses begin
July 12:    Last day to complete deposit of Aug doctoral dissertations
July 19:    Last day to complete deposit of Aug Master's theses
July 19:    Last day to withdraw from S2 without a grade of W
July 19:    Last day for student to drop a S2 or SS1 Independent Study course
July 19:    Last day to elect credit/no-credit option for a S2 or SS1 Indep. Study course or to change
from credit/no-credit option to a regular grade
July 19:    Last day to add a second half-session (S2b) course
July 26:    Last day to drop a second half-session (S2b) course
July 26:    Last day to elect credit/no-credit option for a second half-session (S2b) course or to change
from credit/no-credit option to a regular grade
August 1:   Instruction ends - (noon)
August 1:   Reading Day - (1pm)
Aug 2-3:    Final examination period
August 5:   August degree conferral (no commencement)
August 9:   Last date for receipt of completed petitions in the Graduate College for graduating students

 

RESEARCH FORUM

Center for Writing Studies - Graduate Student Research Forum
May 2, 2013
4:00-5:30 p.m.
126 GSLIS

Andrea Olinger, Department of English
“Styling Science: A Case Study of Enculturation into Disciplinary Writing Style”

In writing studies, the meaning of the term “style” tends to be assumed and undefined or loosely defined—as, say, a writer’s linguistic and rhetorical choices. In either case, style is typically treated as a static property controlled by the writer, with little attention given to its interpretation and reception. Disciplinary style has suffered from similar inattention, with the neat, discrete notion that different disciplines write differently often going unquestioned. Empirical research within writing studies on the co-constructed, dynamic nature of style, disciplinary or otherwise, is scarce. In this talk, I argue for a more rigorous and usable understanding of enculturation into disciplinary writing styles. Drawing on sociocultural, dialogic approaches to language, I describe writing styles as heterogeneous collections of multisemiotic resources with situated histories. I then ground this theory in ethnographic research on how academic writing styles are represented, debated, learned, and taught, presenting one particular case of writers in psychology. Through literacy history and text-based interviews with a senior psychology major and her professor—along with analyses of drafts of her honors thesis and the professor’s writing guide—I explore the difficulties of locating discipline-specific writing style, show that particular language ideologies dominate how writers understand style, and illustrate how a dialogic perspective can help us better understand disciplinary enculturation into this nebulous thing called style.

Jon W. Stone, Department of English
“Inventing Jazz: Jelly Roll Morton and the Sonic Rhetorics of Vernacular Musical Performance”

In May of 1938, Ferdinand “Jelly Roll” Morton arrived at the Library of Congress claiming to be the inventor of jazz. Alan Lomax, the folklorist in charge of the music archive there in Washington D.C., was skeptical. He was weary of the type of jazz that dominated the radio, jazz that white performers had appropriated to make more “accessible,” more commercial. But Morton’s story, which included roots in turn-of-the-century New Orleans, compelled Lomax, who later remarked: “I thought I’d take this cat on [and] see how much folk music a jazz musician knows.”

My presentation focuses on key moments of Morton’s recorded argument for his own authenticity as an originator of jazz music and for his place in the larger historical mythos of jazz. We’ll listen together for three layers of sonic rhetoricity that Morton develops in the interviews with Lomax. In the first, Morton uses detailed oral history as a deliberative argument against other musicians’ claims for the authorship of jazz. In the second, Morton’s virtuosic musical skill works as a kind of epideictic aretētied to the distinguishing and disciplining of certain social and musical values in the jazz community. In the third, Morton declares and demonstrates how “jazz is a style that can be applied to any type of tune.” In other words, in the same way that eloquence is the result of applying the art of rhetoric to language, jazz is the result of deploying a distinct set of musical skills to a melody. In this way, jazz can be thought of as a rhetoric of music, and Morton a sonic rhetorician.

For more information contact Teresa Bertram at 333-3251 (tbertram@illinois.edu)