Department of English, College of LAS, University of Illinois


Footnotes: The English Department Newsletter

Volume 57 | October 22, 2012| Number 7

FROM THE GRADUATE STUDIES OFFICE

Fellowship Payment
Graduate students on fellowship for the Fall semester (8/16/12-12/15/12), will receive their last fellowship payment on 12/16/12.


Fall 2012 - Dates to Remember
October 22: Second half-session courses begin
October 29: Registration for spring begins.  Start times vary.  See you time ticket for your exact
enrollment time at UI Integrate Self-Service
November 9: Last day to add a second half-session course
November 16: Last day to withdraw from the current term without a grade of W
November 16: Last day to elect credit/no-credit option for a semester course or to change from
credit/no-credit option to a regular grade
November 16: Last day for student to drop a semester course without a grade of W (without
approval)
November 16: Last day to take final exam for December doctoral degree
November 16: Last day to add name to Dec degree list.  Must use Web Self-Service
Nov 17 - 25: Fall vacation for students
Nov 22 - 23: Thanksgiving Break (all campus holiday)
November 26: Instruction resumes
November 30: Deadline for Graduate Student Academic Services office to receive the final exam
Certificate of Result
December 7:  Last day to complete deposit of December doctoral dissertations
December 7:  Last day to elect credit/no-credit option for a second half-session course or to change
from credit/no-credit option to a regular grade
December 7:  Last day to drop a second half-session course
December 12: Instruction ends
December 13: Reading Day
December 13: Last day to add or drop a second half-session course with approval (a W is recorded)
December 13: Last day to add or drop a semester course with approval (a W is recorded)
December 13:  Last day to change a grade of DFR (in a non-thesis course) or I, awarded last spring or
summer to prevent F by rule
December 14: Last day to complete deposit of December master’s theses
Dec 14 – 20: Final examination period       
December 21:  Last date for receipt of completed petitions in the Graduate College for graduating
students
December 24:  December degree conferral (no commencement)

 

Spring 2013 – Dates to Remember 
January 11:  Deadline to cancel spring registration
January 14:  Instruction begins
January 21: Martin Luther King Day (all-campus holiday)
January 28: Last day to add a first-half session course
January 28: Last day for student to add a semester course without permission
January 28: Deadline to submit forms to elect to audit a course for the semester
February 22: Last day to elect credit-no-credit option for a first half-session course or to change
from credit-no-credit option to a regular grade
February 22: Last day to drop a first half-session course
March 8: Last day for student to drop a semester course on Web Self-Service
March 11: Second half-session courses begin
March 16-24: Spring Break
March 25: Instruction resumes
 April 1:  Registration for summer and fall begins.  Start times vary.  See your time ticket for
your exact enrollment time at UI Integrate Self Service (https://apps.uillinois.edu/selfservice/)
April 5: Last day to add a second half-session course
April 5:  Last day to take final exam for May doctoral degree
April 12: Deadline for Graduate Student Academic Services office to receive the final exam
 Certificate of Result
April 12: Last day to withdraw from the current term without a grade of W
April 12: Last day to elect credit-no-credit option for a semester course or to change from
credit-no-credit option to a regular grade
April 12: Last day for student to drop a semester course without a grade of W (without
approval)
April 12:  Last day to add name to May degree list.  Must use Web Self-Service
April 19:  Last day to complete deposit of May doctoral dissertations
April 26:  Last day to elect credit-no-credit option for a second half-session course or to change
 from credit-no-credit option to a regular grade
April 26:  Last day to drop a second half-session course
April 26:  Last day to complete deposit of May master’s theses
May 1: Instruction ends
May 2: Reading Day
May 2: Last day to add or drop a second half-session course with approval (a W is recorded)
May 2: Last day to add or drop a semester course with approval (a W is recorded)
May 2:  Last day to change a grade of DFR (in a non-thesis course) or I, awarded last fall to
prevent F by rule
May 3 -10: Final examination period       
May 12:  May degree conferral (Commencement)
May 17:  Last date for receipt of completed petitions in the Graduate College for graduating
students

 

COLLOQUIUM

Center for Writing Studies’ Colloquium Series
Daniel Perrin
Professor
Zurich University of Applied Sciences

Thursday, October 25, 2012
4:00 – 5:30 p.m.
126 LIS

Coming to grips with dynamics and complexity: Methodological challenges to real-life writing research

Linguistics first considered written language, later focused on conversations as processes, and only then rediscovered written language from a process perspective. Whereas psycholinguistic research on writing focuses on key logging and eye tracking to analyze micro processes, such as planning, between linguistic units in experimental settings, sociolinguistics and applied linguistics relate writing practices in the field to social macrostructures and problems such as social diversity and change. In doing so, they understand microdevelopment as a methodologically accessible activity that stands for similar, but less accessible developments on higher levels and timescales.

In my presentation, I discuss the methodological potential of research frameworks in “real-life” writing research, focusing on newswriting as a field of application. After a short overview of four more traditional research frameworks in the research on newswriting, I focus on Dynamic Systems Theory (DST). I argue that DST fosters approaches appropriate to the complexity of writing in multi-layered real-world contexts. On the one hand, DST provides conceptual metaphors needed to understand why and how it makes sense to systematically analyze a world in which everything is connected. On the other hand, DST enables researchers to develop empirically grounded models of processes at the edge of chaos – processes such as dealing with time pressure, poor quality pictures and emergent ideas when writing a piece of news.

The presentation foregrounds DST’s potential for explaining the dynamics and complexity of writing processes in real-world contexts such as the domain of newswriting. I will refer throughout to a newswriting process by an experienced journalist about demonstrations in Lebanon, as a case of such real-world writing. On an empirical level, I exploit data from this Lebanon case to show that changing a single word in an emerging news text can mean reframing both the writing process and the text product. On a theoretical level, I draw on the Lebanon case to explain how and why DST helps researchers conceptualize and model the complexity of newswriting.

For more information, contact Teresa Bertram at 333-3251 (tbertram@illinois.edu)