English Course Descriptions: Fall 2009

Creative Writing Courses

All courses in the creative writing series emphasize the student’s own work and are taught as workshops. The classes have an enrollment limit of 18 to insure the maximum efficiency of the workshop and to permit adequate individual attention. Class attendance and participation will be counted as an extremely important part of the course requirement.

NARRATIVE

104 INTRODUCTORY NARRATIVE WRITING

Practice in the writing of narrative prose, with primary emphasis on short fiction. Prerequisite: Completion of campus Composition I general education requirement.

204 INTERMEDIATE NARRATIVE WRITING

Practice in the writing of fiction, with emphasis on the short story. Prerequisite: CW 104 or equivalent.

404 ADVANCED NARRATIVE WRITING

Prerequisite is CW 204. This third level workshop continues the writing of fiction at a more advanced level. Students meet regular deadlines and work on projects of their own design.

POETRY

106 INTRODUCTORY POETRY WRITING

Practice in the writing of poetry; experimentation with a number of fixed forms and free verse, but emphasis mainly on the student’s freedom to develop a personal style. Prerequisite: Completion of campus Composition I general education requirement.

206 INTERMEDIATE POETRY WRITING

Builds upon the workshop format of CW 106, with an emphasis on prosody and poetic technique. Students will deepen their sense of craft by putting into practice their study and understanding of a variety of poetic forms (e.g., syllabic poetry, dramatic monologue, sonnet, bound/free verse) and technical concerns (e.g., voice, tone, line, line break, image). The workshop component of the course typically includes 8-12 completed poems and their revisions. Prerequisite: CW 106.

406 ADVANCED POETRY WRITING

Practice of the writing of poetry aided by intensive study of examples. Prerequisite: CW 106 or equivalent.

455 WRITING TUTORIAL - EXPOSITORY, POETRY OR NARRATIVE

This is a tutorial course which is designed to accommodate advanced student-writers of either fiction, poetry or exposition. In fiction the course is designed to follow CW 404. In poetry it follows CW 406. In exposition CW 455 follows CW 208. The students have some, though not complete choice of instructor, with whom they plan their work and arrange their conferences. A substantial amount of writing is expected, either as a single longer project or as a series of shorter pieces. As in all tutorial arrangements, self-motivation and self-discipline are essential in successfully meeting the demands of the course. This course may be used to help fulfill the requirements in Honors. This course may be repeated for a total of 6 hours.

GRADUATE SEMINARS

500 E THE CRAFT OF FICTION, Graham. M 1-3:20

Examination of the creative process of fiction from the perspectives of aesthetics and techniques, illustrated from the work of selected authors.

502 E PROBELMS IN POETRY WRITING, Harrington. W 1-3:50

Examination of the creative process of poetry from the perspective of aesthetics and techniques, illustrated from the work of selected authors.

504 G WRITING WORKSHOP IN FICTION, D. Wright. W 3-4:50

Directed individual projects, with group discussion in fiction.

506 T WRITING WORKSHOP IN POETRY, Kelly. TH 3-5:50

Directed individual projects, with group discussion in fiction.

560 NL LITERARY PUBLISHING & PROMOTION, J. Stanley. Arranged

A working practicum designed to teach graduate students the basics of literary journal publishing and to introduce them to career and entrepreneurial opportunities in other types of literary arts organizations. Students will attend weekly editorial meetings, complete weekly reading assignments, and will work 2 hours per week in the ‘Ninth Letter’ office, reading manuscript submissions and completing various clerical tasks for the journal. Approved for both letter and S/U grading. May be repeated to a maximum of 8 hours. Prerequisite: MFA candidate standing.

563 T SPECIAL TOPICS, Dianne Stanley. TU 3-4:50

TOPIC: Writing for Television

An overview of the basics for writing the one-hour episodic drama: format, plot, character, and dialogue. Students will complete a teleplay based on a current prime-time series. Includes formulating and receiving critical analysis. Final Draft scriptwriting software (student version) required. Prerequisite: MFA candidate standing or approval from instructor. Inquiries should be sent to Steve Davenport at sdavenpo@illinois.edu.

Dianne Messina Stanley has written and/or produced nearly 400 hours of prime-time television, including such shows as Strong Medicine, Judging Amy, Early Edition, and Knots Landing. She currently serves as Consulting Producer on Army Wives.

Get in Touch

Search Type