English Course Descriptions: Fall 2012

Creative Writing Courses

All courses in the creative writing series emphasize the student’s own work and are taught as workshops. The classes have an enrollment limit of 18 to insure the maximum efficiency of the workshop and to permit adequate individual attention. Class attendance and participation will be counted as an extremely important part of the course requirement.

104 INTRODUCTORY NARRATIVE WRITING

Practice in the writing of narrative prose, with primary emphasis on short fiction. Prerequisite: Completion of campus Composition I general education requirement.

106 INTRODUCTORY POETRY WRITING

Practice in the writing of poetry; experimentation with a number of fixed forms and free verse, but emphasis mainly on the student’s freedom to develop a personal style. Prerequisite: Completion of campus Composition I general education requirement.

204 INTERMEDIATE NARRATIVE WRITING

Practice in the writing of fiction, with emphasis on the short story. Prerequisite: CW 104 or equivalent.

206 INTERMEDIATE POETRY WRITING

Builds upon the workshop format of CW 106, with an emphasis on prosody and poetic technique. Students will deepen their sense of craft by putting into practice their study and understanding of a variety of poetic forms (e.g., syllabic poetry, dramatic monologue, sonnet, bound/free verse) and technical concerns (e.g., voice, tone, line, line break, image). The workshop component of the course typically includes 8-12 completed poems and their revisions. Prerequisite: CW 106.

208 S CREATIVE NONFICTION WRITING, D. Wright. TUTH 2-3:15

Types of nonfiction prose, including the personal essay, memoir, literary journalism, and historical writing. Prerequisite: RHET 233 or RHET 243, or equivalent, or consent of instructor.

404 1U/1G ADVANCED NARRATIVE WRITING, Graham. MW 9:30-10:45

Prerequisite is CW 204. This third level workshop continues the writing of fiction at a more advanced level. Students meet regular deadlines and work on projects of their own design.

404 3U/3G ADVANCED NARRATIVE WRITING, Howe. TUTH 3:30-4:45

Prerequisite is CW 204. This third level workshop continues the writing of fiction at a more advanced level. Students meet regular deadlines and work on projects of their own design.

406 1U/1G ADVANCED POETRY WRITING, Harrington. MW 11-12:15

Are you passionate about literary poetry? Do you want to connect your writing to a 3,000 year old tradition that has evolved ballads, sonnets, sestinas, ghazals, kwansabas, pantoums, and hundreds of other poetic forms? This is the workshop where you will write, read, and write more poetry. The workshop will challenge you to write stronger poetry, learn new forms, read poetry through a variety of aesthetic lenses, sharpen your editorial skills, and shape a distinct poetic voice. Prerequisite: CW 206 or equivalent.

455 WRITING TUTORIAL - NARRATIVE, POETRY, OR CREATIVE NONFICTION

This is a tutorial course for advanced student-writers in Narrative, Poetry, or Creative Nonfiction. In Narrative and Poetry, the tutorial is designed for students who have completed the advanced course in their primary genre (404 in Narrative, 406 in Poetry). In Creative Nonfiction, the tutorial is designed to follow the intermediate course, CW 208. Interested students need to find an instructor with the time available for such an arrangement. A substantial amount of writing is expected, either as a single longer project or as a series of shorter pieces. As in all tutorial arrangements, self-motivation and self-discipline are essential in successfully meeting the demands of the course. This course may be repeated for a total of 6 hours.

RHETORIC CLASSES FOR RHETORIC/CREATIVE WRITING MAJORS

RHET 199 AL1 UNDERGRAD OPEN SEMINAR, Rubins. Lect: 2 MW; Disc: F 2 & 3

TOPIC: Introduction to Creative Writing: Technique

“We make art.” And in that endeavor we employ a language, a skill set, a range of practical and intuitive faculties. The purpose of this course is to give the student some insight into the making of stories and poems and to enhance their own abilities to be productive contributors and critics in future creative writing workshops. Writers make numerous technical choices in creating a story or a poem, this class will not only acquaint you with many of them but it will also give you the opportunity to put them into effect. On Mondays we will have lectures on specific elements of poetry and fiction. Wednesdays will be dedicated to readings by faculty and visiting writers. Fridays will allow you the opportunity to work in small group discussion sections applying the techniques and skills to a close reading of stories and poems.

RHET 199 can count for the Rhetoric/Creative Writing major. Please see the advising office for details.

RHET 243 T INTERMEDIATE EXPOSITORY WRITING. TUTH 3:30-4:45

Rhetoric 243 is restricted to rhetoric majors. This course will give further and extensive practice in expository writing, with emphasis on style and critical analysis. Class activities include incorporating nonfiction prose sources smoothly into arguments, audience analysis, and writing in different contexts. Students should leave Rhetoric 243 with a polished nonfiction prose style, particularly in argument. Course size is limited to 24 students. Students will produce 7,500 words of polished prose as well as frequent in-process writing. Prerequisite: completion of campus Composition I requirement. This course fulfills the campus Advanced Composition requirement.

GRADUATE SEMINARS

500 G THE CRAFT OF FICTION, Shakar. M 5-6:50

Examination of the creative process of fiction from the perspectives of aesthetics and techniques, illustrated from the work of selected authors.

502 T PROBLEMS IN POETRY WRITING, Kelly. TH 3-4:50

Examination of the creative process of poetry from the perspective of aesthetics and techniques, illustrated from the work of selected authors.

504 E WRITING WORKSHOP IN FICTION, Graham. M 1-2:50

Directed projects in fiction writing, either short stories or sections of a novel, with group discussion and critique. There will be a course packet for the class, featuring short stories and essays on the writing of fiction and related topics; there will be a discussion of these readings at the beginning of each class meeting.

506 R WRITING WORKSHOP IN POETRY, Harrington. TU 1-2:50

Directed individual projects, with group discussion in fiction.

560 NL LITERARY PUBLISHING & PROMOTION, Stanley. Arranged

A working practicum designed to teach graduate students the basics of literary journal publishing and to introduce them to career and entrepreneurial opportunities in other types of literary arts organizations. Students will attend weekly editorial meetings, complete weekly reading assignments, and will work 2 hours per week in the ‘Ninth Letter’ office, reading manuscript submissions and completing various clerical tasks for the journal. Approved for both letter and S/U grading. May be repeated to a maximum of 8 hours. Prerequisite: MFA candidate standing.

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