Creative Writing Courses - Fall 2015

100 X INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING, Rubins. MW 12:30-1:45

Acquaint students with the technical choices a writer makes in creating a story or a poem. Mondays are given to lectures on specific elements of poetry and fiction. Wednesdays are dedicated to readings by faculty and visiting writers. Fridays allow students the opportunity to work in small group discussion sections applying the week's techniques and skills to a close reading of stories and poems.

104 INTRODUCTORY NARRATIVE WRITING

Practice in the writing of narrative prose, with primary emphasis on short fiction. Prerequisite: Completion of campus Composition I general education requirement.

104 PG INTRODUCTORY NARRATIVE WRITING, Graham. MTuWTh 11-12:15

(First 8 week session: August 24 – October 16, 2015)

This 8 week beginning narrative writing course will be an intensive introduction to the forms and process of writing fiction, and will be devoted to discovering the joys and risk-taking of writing.

At least twice a week there will be in-class writing prompts (how to write a compelling first paragraph, how to write dialogue, etc), so that students may use this material in developing their longer stories that will be workshopped in class. These prompts will be designed to challenge a student to attempt writing something he or she might never have considered before, but the atmosphere of the class will be welcoming: taking risks, and learning from mistakes (as well as successes!) is the best way to become a writer.

Texts for the class will include Writing Fiction: A Guide to Narrative Craft, an issue of Draft: The Journal of Process (which focuses on the art of revision), and a course pack of short stories.

106 INTRODUCTORY POETRY WRITING

Practice in the writing of poetry; experimentation with a number of fixed forms and free verse, but emphasis mainly on the student’s freedom to develop a personal style. Prerequisite: Completion of campus Composition I general education requirement.

200 D READING FOR WRITERS. MW 11-12:15

Think of Reading for Writers as the course a group of fiction writers and poets might take when they want to talk and write about the mechanics of stories and poems, the decisions that face writers as they build or shape the things they write, the formal elements that time and again surface as the basic tools at hand. This course seeks also to help writers understand the necessity for a shared reading list that encourages conversations among writers about what we do and how it gets done well. Such a reading list should help writers as they move through one of our Creative Writing sequences, poetry or fiction. This class satisfies a literature requirement in the Creative Writing major.

202 JH TOPICS IN CREATIVE WRITING, Harjo. TUTH 11-1:20

(First 8 week session: August 24 – October 16, 2015)

TOPIC: Creative Writing with Readings in Contemporary Indigenous Poetry

This will be primarily a poetry-writing workshop with an introduction to North American and Pacific Indigenous poetry. Students will write poetry derived from assignments inspired by readings and discussions of assigned texts. These poems will be critiqued in class. Texts may include Puna Wai Kōrero, an Anthology of Māori Poetry in English, edited by Reina Whaitiri and Robert Sullivan, Sing: Poetry From the Indigenous Americas, edited by Allison Adelle Hedge Coke, Indigenous Poetics in Canada, edited by Neal McLoud (with a handout of poems), or Mauri Ola: Contemporary Polynesian Poems in English, edited by Albert Wendt, Reina Whaitiri, and Robert Sullivan. Weekly response papers to the readings will also be required.

202 AS TOPICS IN CREATIVE WRITING, Shakar. M 2-4:20

TOPIC: Screenwriting Workshop

A workshop in the fundamentals of screenwriting, exploring the basic theory and formal aspects of story structure, character development, use of conflict, scene-writing and dialogue. Students will do exercises and conceive of a premise for their own feature-length screenplay, for which they will then write a treatment, a synopsis, an outline, and the first act. This course assumes familiarity with the basics of fiction writing. Students must have completed CW 104 to take this course.

202 G TOPICS IN CREATIVE WRITING, Sanders. MW 3:30-4:45

TOPIC: Writing the Young Adult and Middle Grade Novel

In this workshop, we’ll be writing for both Young Adults (ages 12 and up) and the Middle Grade crowd (ages 8-12). We’ll embark upon the long and lovely process of writing a full-length novel for these demographics, with plenty of discussion about planning, process, and market appeal. We’ll also read and discuss literature for those age groups—from Harry Potter to the Hunger Games, from John Green to Kate DiCamillo—to help inform our own writing as we seek to create quality literature for younger readers.

204 INTERMEDIATE NARRATIVE WRITING

Practice in the writing of fiction, with emphasis on the short story. Prerequisite: CW 104 or equivalent.

206 P INTERMEDIATE POETRY WRITING, Madonick. TUTH 11-12:15

Builds upon the workshop format of CW 106 with an emphasis on prosody and poetic technique. Students will deepen their sense of craft by putting into practice their study and understanding of a variety of poetic forms (e.g., syllabic poetry, dramatic monologue, sonnet, bound/free verse) and technical concerns (e.g., voice, tone, line, line break, image). The workshop component of the course typically includes 8-12 completed poems and their revisions.

208 P CREATIVE NONFICTION WRITING, TUTH 11-12:15

Types of nonfiction prose, including the personal essay, memoir, literary journalism, and historical writing. Prerequisite: RHET 233 or CW 243, or equivalent, or consent of instructor.

243 M INTERMEDIATE EXPOSITORY WRITING. TUTH 9:30-10:45

Practice in expository types, with emphasis on style and critical analysis. Restricted to Creative Writing majors. Prerequisite: completion of campus Composition I requirement. This course fulfills the campus Advanced Composition requirement.

404 1U/1G ADVANCED NARRATIVE WRITING, Sanders. MW 2-3:15

Prerequisite is CW 204. This third level workshop continues the writing of fiction at a more advanced level. Students meet regular deadlines and work on projects of their own design.

404 2U/2G ADVANCED NARRATIVE WRITING, Sneed. TUTH 2-3:15

Prerequisite is CW 204. This third level workshop continues the writing of fiction at a more advanced level. Students meet regular deadlines and work on projects of their own design.

406 1U/1G ADVANCED POETRY WRITING, Harrington. TUTH 11-12:15

Practice of the writing of poetry aided by intensive study of examples. Prerequisite: CW 206 or equivalent. Prerequisite: CW 206 or equivalent.

455 WRITING TUTORIAL - NARRATIVE, POETRY, OR CREATIVE NONFICTION

This is a tutorial course for advanced student-writers in Narrative, Poetry, or Creative Nonfiction. In Narrative and Poetry, the tutorial is designed for students who have completed the advanced course in their primary genre (404 in Narrative, 406 in Poetry). In Creative Nonfiction, the tutorial is designed to follow the intermediate course, CW 208. Interested students need to find an instructor with the time available for such an arrangement. A substantial amount of writing is expected, either as a single longer project or as a series of shorter pieces. As in all tutorial arrangements, self-motivation and self-discipline are essential in successfully meeting the demands of the course. This course may be repeated for a total of 6 hours.

460 D INTRO TO LITERARY EDITING. MW 11-12:15

Practicum in which students learn all the stages of developing and editing a literary publication. Students will solicit, read, and select poems and stories for an online supplement to the Ninth Letter literary journal. At the end of the semester, the supplement will be published on the Ninth Letter website (www.ninthletter.com). Students will gain experience in professional communications, copyediting, and marketing. No graduate credit. Prerequisite: CW 104 or CW 106.

GRADUATE SEMINARS

500 T THE CRAFT OF FICTION, Sneed. TH 3:30-5:20

Examination of the creative process of fiction from the perspectives of aesthetics and techniques, illustrated from the work of selected authors.

502 G PROBLEMS IN POETRY WRITING, Kelly. W 3-4:50

Examination of the creative process of poetry from the perspective of aesthetics and techniques, illustrated from the work of selected authors.

504 W WRITING WORKSHOP IN FICTION, Shakar. M 5-6:50

Directed projects in fiction writing, either short stories or sections of a novel, with group discussion and critique. There will be a course packet for the class, featuring short stories and essays on the writing of fiction and related topics; there will be a discussion of these readings at the beginning of each class meeting.

506 T WRITING WORKSHOP IN POETRY, Madonick. TH 3-4:50

Directed individual projects, with group discussion in fiction.

563 JH SPECIAL TOPICS, Harjo. TH 2-5:20

(First 8 week session: August 24 – October 16, 2015)

TOPIC: Memoir

This course is an examination of the memoir form and will address the art and craft of memoir writing, including revelation, narrative density, risk-taking, plot structures and trajectories, honesty, and other considerations. This is not a workshop but a hybrid directed course in memoir writing. Readings will be tailored to each student. I will meet individually with each student every week. Students will come together twice during the eight-week workshop to share and discuss.

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