English Course Descriptions: Spring 2013

Business and Technical Writing Courses

BTW 250 PRINCIPLES OF BUSINESS WRITING

This course teaches students to apply the principles of successful professional communication to business writing tasks. Students will also practice editing and supervising the writing of others. Assignments replicate typical business cases, scenarios, situations and cultures; they also deal with multiple audiences. They range in complexity, length, formatting demands, and the manipulating of genre. This course features an extended section on writing longer reports based on information collected, interpreted and compiled from several sources. This course fulfills the campus Advanced Composition requirement.

BTW 261 TECHNICAL AND SCIENTIFIC COMMUNICATION

This course teaches students to apply the principles of successful professional communication to a range of realistic cases in technical communication. It emphasizes flexible problem-solving skills and a clear style for communicating technical information to a range of readers. Students will also practice editing and supervising the writing of others. Assignments will include correspondence, instructions, proposals, and a technical report or similar project. This course fulfills the campus Advanced Composition requirement.

BTW 263 P WRITING IN THE DISCIPLINES, Pincus. TUTH 11-12:15

TOPIC: “Do The Right Thing”: Poor Advice for Business Writers?

How do we “do the right thing” when our business mission conflicts with a legitimate interest not our own? And, what does it mean to "do the right thing" through writing? Ethical conflicts abound among communities with a shared interest in addressing key issues facing the world today. Our goal will be to improve our understanding of how to use community engagement to communicate ethically and professionally; we will conduct case studies and develop our own plans for managing an ethical crisis involving multiple interest groups. This course fulfills the campus Advanced Composition requirement.

BTW 263 S WRITING IN THE DISCIPLINES, Marks-Dubbs. TUTH 2-3:15

TOPIC: Design, Advocate: Texts and Social Change

How can we creatively design advocacy campaigns to bring about social change? In this course, we will study an array of advocacy campaigns, from breast cancer awareness to animal rights activism. We will explore effective (and ineffective) strategies for designing multimedia texts that integrate photography, video, and sound. With a variety of exercises in audience analysis, branding, and writing style, we will develop fresh perspectives and design strategies to reinvent the public face of causes to which audiences might have become complacent toward. This course fulfills the campus Advanced Composition requirement.

BTW 271 PERSUASIVE WRITING

This course teaches students to apply the principles of successful persuasive communication to the writing of advertising, marketing, and public relations documents. Students will analyze, design, and write a range of persuasive documents, including media releases, print advertising, direct mail, promotional materials, and recommendation reports. Students will also practice editing and supervising the writing of others.

BTW 290 INDEPENDENT STUDY

This independent study course is best suited to students who have already completed either 250, 271, or 272 and would like to do special work in a topic not covered in these courses. Before attempting to enroll, students should identify a topic for study and talk with the instructor with whom they wish to work. Students should consult the Director of B&TW if interested in an Independent Study.

402 1U/1G DESCRIPTIVE ENGLISH GRAMMAR, Prior. MW 3:30-4:45

This course introduces different approaches to studying and analyzing English language and language practices. We will consider traditional and modern systems for describing English grammar, how registers form and operate, relationships between talk and text, the interaction of visual and linguistic dimensions of texts, approaches to grammar instruction, some sociological dimensions of language use, and language practices in everyday environments. Course requirements include reading, in-class and out-of-class writing and exercises, participation in class activities, two short analysis papers, and a final project.

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