Department of English, College of LAS, University of Illinois


English Course Descriptions: Summer 2011


Summer Session I (May 16 – June 10)
Summer Session II (June 13 – August 4)

 

SUMMER SESSION II

English 109 D—INTRODUCTION TO FICTION (ADVANCED COMPOSITION), Trilling. MTuWTh 11-12:15

English 109 is designed to introduce students to the critical analysis of prose fiction. By reading a wide range of short and long fiction across several historical periods, we will examine how such narrative strategies as plot, character, point of view and language construct meaning.  Individual instructors will bring a variety of texts and interpretive methods to their courses, but special emphasis will be placed on concepts and skills central to good literary critical writing.  This course fulfills the campus Advanced Composition requirement.

English 109 X—INTRODUCTION TO FICTION (ADVANCED COMPOSITION). MTuWTh 12:30-1:45

English 109 is designed to introduce students to the critical analysis of prose fiction. By reading a wide range of short and long fiction across several historical periods, we will examine how such narrative strategies as plot, character, point of view and language construct meaning.  Individual instructors will bring a variety of texts and interpretive methods to their courses, but special emphasis will be placed on concepts and skills central to good literary critical writing.  This course fulfills the campus Advanced Composition requirement.

English 267 A—GRIMMS’ FAIRY TALES IN CONTEXT.  MWF 1-2:50
        same as GER 250, CWL 250

Special attention is paid to the Grimms’ tales in terms of traditional narrative genres, elements of life in early modern Europe, and versions from Italy and France as well as Germany. Course is conducted in English.  This course fulfills the campus Advanced Composition requirement.

English 461 1U/1GTOPICS IN LITERATURE, C. Wright.  MTuWTh 12:30-1:45                                               Group
TOPIC: Celtic Myths and Legends

This course examines the “Celtic” myths and legends of medieval Ireland.  We will read (in modern English translation) medieval Irish tales of gods and goddesses, druids and druidesses, heroes and heroines:  tales of voyages to the Celtic Otherworld, of feasts where warriors contend for the “champion’'s portion,” of strange births and tragic deaths, of magical transformations, of courtships and cattle-raids.  Texts include the Ulster Cycle stories about the boy-hero Cú Chulainn, king Conchobar, Fergus and queen Medb, culminating in the great Irish epic, The Táin Bó Cuailnge (“The Cattle Raid of Cooley”).  In addition to the primary focus on the mythological literature, we will also some texts representative of the “Celtic” spirituality of early Christian Ireland, such as the Lives of Saints Patrick and Brigid and the Voyage of Saint Brendan.  As we read the literature we will also study aspects of the history, art, and culture of early medieval Ireland from the pagan Celtic period through the early Christian era and down to the Viking invasions and the Anglo-Norman conquest.

 

CW 104 B—INTRODUCTORY NARRATIVE WRITING, Madonick.  MTuWTh 9:30-10:45

CW 104 is the beginning course in the writing of short fiction.  There may be some minimal “structuring” and specific assignments, especially in the beginning, to ease the student into the discipline of writing fictional prose.  Somewhat less production is expected than in the more advanced courses.  Students will be required to submit their own stories for criticism from the class.  An anthology of short fiction may be required.

 

Rhetoric 105 D—PRINCIPLES OF COMPOSITION, MTuWTh 11-12:15

Rhetoric 105 is a basic study of the methods of exposition, particularly of academic argumentative writing based on sources.  Emphasis will be on stance, thesis, organization, drafting, revising, and editing.  All sections require 30 typed pages of finished writing, usually divided into seven essays and a research paper.  There is no final exam.  This course fulfills the campus Comp. I requirement.

 

B&TW 250—PRINCIPLES OF BUSINESS COMMUNICATION, Multiple sections - see course schedule.

This course teaches students to apply the principles of successful professional communication to business writing tasks.  Students will also practice editing and supervising the writing of others.  Assignments replicate typical business cases, scenarios, situations and cultures; they also deal with multiple audiences.  They range in complexity, length, formatting demands, and the manipulating of genre.  This course features an extended section on writing longer reports based on information collected, interpreted and compiled from several sources.  Three on-line sections offered – section OL1, OL2 and OL3.  This course fulfills the campus Advanced Compositio