English Course Descriptions: Summer 2010

Session II (June 14 – August 5)

English 109 B—INTRODUCTION TO FICTION (ADVANCED COMPOSITION). MTuWTh 9:30-10:45

English 109 is designed to introduce students to the critical analysis of prose fiction. By reading a wide range of short and long fiction across several historical periods, we will examine how such narrative strategies as plot, character, point of view and language construct meaning. Individual instructors will bring a variety of texts and interpretive methods to their courses, but special emphasis will be placed on concepts and skills central to good literary critical writing. This course fulfills the campus Advanced Composition requirement.

English 109 D—INTRODUCTION TO FICTION (ADVANCED COMPOSITION). MTuWTh 11-12:15

English 109 is designed to introduce students to the critical analysis of prose fiction. By reading a wide range of short and long fiction across several historical periods, we will examine how such narrative strategies as plot, character, point of view and language construct meaning. Individual instructors will bring a variety of texts and interpretive methods to their courses, but special emphasis will be placed on concepts and skills central to good literary critical writing. This course fulfills the campus Advanced Composition requirement.

English 109 X—INTRODUCTION TO FICTION (ADVANCED COMPOSITION). MTuWTh 12:30-1:45

English 109 is designed to introduce students to the critical analysis of prose fiction. By reading a wide range of short and long fiction across several historical periods, we will examine how such narrative strategies as plot, character, point of view and language construct meaning. Individual instructors will bring a variety of texts and interpretive methods to their courses, but special emphasis will be placed on concepts and skills central to good literary critical writing. This course fulfills the campus Advanced Composition requirement.

English 200 F—INTRO TO THE STUDY OF LIT. MTuWTh 2-3:15

This course might be called “How to Be an English Major.” It offers tips on how to make the transition from the high-school study of literature to college-level study. The class will read a relatively small number of poems, short stories, and plays, exploring a number of critical approaches to each. Emphasis will be placed on close reading of short passages, the historical contexts of literature, the way genre affects our reading practices, and the criteria for persuasive interpretations. Students will practice their critical skills in a number of short papers.

English 251 D—THE AMERICAN NOVEL SINCE 1914. MTuWTh 11-12:15 Group III or V

Critical study of selected American novels from 1914 to the present.

English 267 A—GRIMMS’ FAIRY TALES IN CONTEXT. MWF 1-2:50

same as GER 250, CWL 250

Special attention is paid to the Grimms’ tales in terms of traditional narrative genres, elements of life in early modern Europe, and versions from Italy and France as well as Germany. Course is conducted in English. This course fulfills the campus Advanced Composition requirement.

English 268 A—THE HOLOCAUST IN CONTEXT. MWF 10-11:50

same as GER 260, CWL 271

Jewish contributions to German Literature from 1200 to the present day. Includes trips to the University Library’s Rare Book Room. This course fulfills the campus Advanced Composition requirement.

English 301 B—CRITICAL APPROACHES TO LIT, Freeburg. MTuWTh 9:30-10:45

This course is an exploration and analysis of the foundations of recent critical approaches to literary and cultural study. Our goal is to discover and inhabit the writings of Freud, Karl Marx, Michel Foucault, Roland Barthes, and Paul De Man to the degree that we too are not just knowledgeable of theories but we can practice them. While much of the course will be dedicated to the aforementioned authors we will look at significant moments in visual art, literature, film, and even television to find creative ways to apply (perhaps reinvent) various concepts and frameworks. There will be two major essays, an exam, and at least one presentation.

English 460—LIT OF AMERICAN MINORITIES, Deck. MTuWTh 11-12:15 Group III or V

TOPIC: Black American Autobiography

This course studies the self-scribed life stories of six prominent African Americans that were published between 1845 and 1995. We will read Douglass’s Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, Written by Himself, Jacobs’s Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, Written by Herself, Wells’s, Crusade for Justice: the Autobiography of Ida B. Wells, Hurston’s Dust Tracks on a Road, Malcom X, The Autobiography of Malcolm X, and Obama’s Dreams from My Father: A Story of Race and Inheritance. We will begin with a short discussion of autobiography as a genre, and then examine the extent to which each African American autobiographer altered the formal features of the genre to suit the particular content of her or his life. Assignments will include short reading responses and one medium length essay. Daily attendance is required.

CW 104 D—INTRODUCTORY NARRATIVE WRITING. MTuWTh 11-112:15

CW 104 is the beginning course in the writing of short fiction. There may be some minimal “structuring” and specific assignments, especially in the beginning, to ease the student into the discipline of writing fictional prose. Somewhat less production is expected than in the more advanced courses. Students will be required to submit their own stories for criticism from the class. An anthology of short fiction may be required.

Rhetoric 105 X—PRINCIPLES OF COMPOSITION, MTuWTh 12:30-1:45

Rhetoric 105 is a basic study of the methods of exposition, particularly of academic argumentative writing based on sources. Emphasis will be on stance, thesis, organization, drafting, revising, and editing. All sections require 30 typed pages of finished writing, usually divided into seven essays and a research paper. There is no final exam. This course fulfills the campus Comp. I requirement.

B&TW 250—PRINCIPLES OF BUSINESS COMMUNICATION, Multiple sections - see course schedule.

This course teaches students to apply the principles of successful professional communication to business writing tasks. Students will also practice editing and supervising the writing of others. Assignments replicate typical business cases, scenarios, situations and cultures; they also deal with multiple audiences. They range in complexity, length, formatting demands, and the manipulating of genre. This course features an extended section on writing longer reports based on information collected, interpreted and compiled from several sources. Two on-line sections offered – section OL1 and OL2. This course fulfills the campus Advanced Composition requirement.

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