Department of English, College of LAS, University of Illinois


Undergraduate Rhetoric Program

About

  • Rhetoric 100, 101, and 102
  • Rhetoric 105

are all courses or course sequences that fulfill the Composition I requirement, a cornerstone of the General Education curriculum at UIUC. These courses are designed for first-year students. Placement in these courses is determined by ACT score.

We also offer courses in Advanced Composition (Rhetoric 233), where students can refine their practice of argumentation and effective use of prose style.

In 2012, the Undergraduate Rhetoric Program received a Writing Program Certificate of Excellence from the Conference on College Composition and Communication.

Course Offerings

Rhetoric 100-102 Sequence

Rhetoric 100-102 is a year-long course sequence that satisfies the Composition I requirement. Students are placed into Rhetoric 100-102 if they earn a 19 or below on the ACT. Students typically enroll in Rhetoric 101 in the fall semester and Rhetoric 102 in the spring. Students in this sequence must be concurrently enrolled in a weekly, one-credit tutorial (Rhetoric 100). The maximum size for these courses is 16 students.

Rhetoric 101, Principles of Writing is instruction in structuring academic, argumentative essays, including how to develop thesis statements and use evidence across different types of writing. This course is the first semester of a two-semester sequence (Rhetoric 101/100-102/100) that fulfills the campus Composition I general education requirement. Credit is not given for both RHET 101 and RHET 105. Prerequisite: Concurrent registration in RHET 100; placement in RHET 100. Must enroll concurrently in RHET 100.

To meet the requirements of Rhetoric 100, students will meet once a week with their instructor for 30-minute tutorial sessions. These weekly meetings will support classroom instruction and offer one-on-one writing instruction.

After completing Rhetoric 101: Principles of Writing, students will be able to

  • Distinguish between the conventions of academic and non-academic texts (print and/or multimodal).
  • Summarize, interpret, and evaluate arguments found in non-fiction texts (print and/or multimodal).
  • Compose argument-driven texts that respond to exigent issues, problems, or debates.
  • Reframe their writing in response to different rhetorical situations.
  • Describe and reflect on their own writing processes, including revisions made in consideration of peer and/or instructor feedback.

Rhetoric 102, Principles of Research offers continued instruction in structuring academic, argumentative essays, concentrating on the use of primary and secondary sources as evidence in research-based arguments. This course is the second semester of a two-semester sequence (RHET 101/100-RHET 102/100) that fulfills the campus Composition I general education requirement. Credit is not given for both RHET 102 and RHET 105. Prerequisite: Concurrent registration in RHET 100; RHET 101. Must enroll concurrently in RHET 100.

To meet the requirements of Rhetoric 100, students will meet once a week with their instruction for 30-minute tutorial sessions. These weekly meetings will support classroom instruction and offer one-on-one writing instruction.

After completing Rhetoric 102: Principles of Research, students will be able to

  • Identify and explain the role of rhetorical appeals and the rhetorical triangle can play in non-fiction print and/or multimodal texts.
  • Create and sustain across one or more pieces of writing a focused research question that responds to an exigent issue, problem, or debate.
  • Compose cogent, research-based arguments, in print-based and/or multimodal texts, for specialist and/or non-specialist audiences.
  • Locate, accurately cite (through summary, paraphrasing, and quoting) and critically evaluate primary and secondary sources.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of writing as a process, including consideration of peer and/or instructor feedback, in one or more pieces of writing from initial draft to final version.

Rhetoric 105: Writing and Research

Rhetoric 105: Writing and Research is instruction in research-based writing and the construction of academic, argumentative essays that use primary and secondary sources as evidence. This course fulfills the campus Composition I general education requirement. Credit is not given for both RHET 105 and any of these other Comp I courses: RHET 101, RHET 102, CMN 111 or CMN 112. Prerequisite: an ACT English score between 20-31.

After completing Rhetoric 105: Writing and Research, students will be able to

  • Identify and explain the role rhetorical appeals and the rhetorical triangle can play in non-fiction print and/or multimodal texts.
  • Create and sustain across one or more pieces of writing a focused research question that responds to an exigent issue, problem, or debate.
  • Compose cogent, research-based arguments, in print-based and/or multimodal texts, for specialist and/or non-specialist audiences.
  • Locate, accurately cite (through summary, paraphrasing, and quoting) and critically evaluate primary and secondary sources.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of writing as a process, including consideration of peer and/or instructor feedback, in one or more pieces of writing from initial draft to final version.

Rhetoric 233: Advanced Composition

Rhetoric 233: Advanced Composition offers advanced-level instruction in developing research-based arguments of moderate complexity within a special topics format. This course can be taken to fulfill the campus Advanced Composition general education requirement. Introduction to the use of multimodal or other non-print resources as evidence in written arguments.

After completing Rhetoric 233: Advanced Composition, students will be able to

  • Evaluate the effectiveness of claims and advanced rhetorical strategies employed in complex arguments in non-fiction print and/or multimodal texts.
  • Situate their ideas in conversation with relevant discourse communities through appropriate source selection, evaluation, and integration (including proper citation practices).
  • Compose arguments in print and/or multimodal texts for a specific discourse community that synthesize multiple and/or competing perspectives.
  • Engage in writing as a recursive process which includes reflection and response to feedback, and that culminates in publication within a peer community.